how to say “good luck” in Hebrew

how to say “good luck” in Hebrew

having trouble seeing the print?

בְּהַצְלָחָה!

 listen and repeat

highly recommended reference 
for further vocabulary growth 


How to go about wishing someone well varies from language to language and from culture to culture.

In English, we say good luck – wishing the person good fortune, that the stars line up for them, that they find a four-leaf clover.

In Hebrew, we say בְּהַצְלָחָה  listen and repeat – literally, with success


If anyone knew how
to encourage people
to be proactive,  it was
the Lubavitcher Rebbe.

A variation of that wish found in more religious circles is בְּרָכָה וְהַצְלָחָה  listen and repeat – blessing and success. This likely derives from the Lubavitcher Rebbe’s staple wish to those in his personal audience, ברכה והצלחה בְּכָל הָעִנְיָנִים  listen and repeat – blessing and success in all (the) matters.

I believe Hebrew’s choice of בהצלחה reflects a more proactive orientation than that of the English good luck – that Jewish/Israeli culture emphasizes the role of the individual’s power to shape their destiny as at least equal to the power of external forces, even divine ones. I think wishing someone הצלחה  listen and repeat success – is more encouraging than wishing them good luck.

What do you think? Feel free to comment below.

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After having studied literature and linguistics on the bachelors level and psychology on the masters, Ami decided to draw upon his hobby of learning languages, his understanding of human thought processes and his skill of explaining complex ideas in simple terms, to found a program that enables people to speak Hebrew with confidence.

3 Comments

  • please show the male and the female form

    Anonymous Reply
  • they’re one and the same, in this case.

    Ami Reply
  • Hi Ami
    that’s very interesing what you write about the role of the effort of the individual in shaping his/her destiny in Jewish culture. i wasn’t aware of this, it does fit the story of Jacob though, who insists on a blesssing from the person with whom he’s wrestling. Actually, i am convinced that this attitude to life is very much superior to the fatalistic attitude one can observe in so many (or all?) cultures where poverty is common, an attitude which seems to be indeed fatal.
    Great post, thanks for your efforts, and i hope and believe you receive blessings for them!
    daktari

    Anonymous Reply

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