Your Daily Dose of Hebrew

how to say “opportunity” in Hebrew

הִזְדַמְּנוּת Earlier this week we saw the Hebrew word for availability – זמינות, which comes from the root ז.מ.נ (z.m.n) meaning time. Another word deriving from that root is הזדמנות – opportunity. For example: פסימיסט רואה בהזדמנות קושי. אופטימיסט רואה בקושי הזדמנות. (וינסטון צ’רצ’יל) A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity […]

By Ami Steinberger | September 2, 2015 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “grief” in Hebrew

צַעַר, יָגוֹן, עֶצֶב, עָגְמַת נֶפֶשׁ Genuine grief, that painful feeling that comes with loss, is variably called in Hebrew צער (pain), יגון (anguish), עצב (sadness) and עגמת נפש (suffering, anguish of the soul). The latter term, עגמת נפש, is sometimes used the way grief is in English in certain contexts – not necessarily in the mournful sense, […]

By Ami Steinberger | September 1, 2015 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “availability” in Hebrew

זְמִינוּת, פְּנִיּוּת The Hebrew root ז.מ.נ (z.m.n) meaning time finds itself in a variety of verbal applications. One of these is the word for available – זמין in the masculine, and זמינה in the feminine. For example, you might text (a woman): את זמינה? אפשר להתקשר? Are you (a female) available? May I call? Likewise, availability […]

By Ami Steinberger | August 31, 2015 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “he goes to X school” in Hebrew

הוּא לוֹמֵד בְּ… In English, when we talk about where a person studies, we often say, “he goes to the Technion” or “she goes to Columbia.” To go is the verb in the expression. In Hebrew, the verb is the active-simple ללמוד – to study. For example: הוא לומד בטכניון. He goes to (studies at) the Technion. and היא […]

By Ami Steinberger | August 30, 2015 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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get your kids to stop fighting at the end of the day… – WEEKLY REVIEW

חֹמֶר לְשִׁנּוּן Review Material Can’t read Hebrew yet? You spent time on your Hebrew this week. Use these review materials to make it yours to keep. Flashcards Game Test שַׁבָּת שָׁלוֹם, וְסוֹף שָׁבוּעַ נָעִים! Shabbat Shalom, and have a nice weekend!

By Ami Steinberger | August 28, 2015 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “with head held high” in Hebrew

בְּרֹאשׁ מוּרָם To lift something, in Hebrew, is להרים, an active-causative verb of the root ר.ו.מ (r.w.m) meaning height. Likewise, מורם – an adjective derived from the passive-causative verb form – means lifted up So that when someone walks with their head held high – with a lifted head – they do so בראש מורם. For example: היא יצאה מהישיבה […]

By Ami Steinberger | August 27, 2015 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “bathroom” in Hebrew (not as obvious as you might think)

שֵׁרוּתִים, חֲדַר אַמְבַּטְיָה This post elaborates on an earlier one. To Americans, the bathroom is where people do what they need to do. Sometimes it has a bathtub in it, sometimes it doesn’t. But to people from the Commonwealth, a bathroom is only called such if it has a tub, while the toilet is the room with an actual toilet. […]

By Ami Steinberger | August 26, 2015 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “to happen” in Hebrew

לִקְרוֹת The Hebrew word for to happen is לקרות, a simple verb whose root is ק.ר.ה (k.r.h). For example: מה קרה? What happened? and the informal greeting: מה קורה? What’s happening? Since the word קרה sounds the same as the word for read as in he read – קרא – even Israelis mix up some forms of the […]

By Ami Steinberger | August 25, 2015 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “at the end of the day” in Hebrew

בְּסוֹפוֹ שֶׁל דָּבָר Translated literally, at the end of the day is בסוף היום in Hebrew. But that phrase is generally used in the figurative sense, not the literal. In the expression, “the day” really means “the matter at hand.” Hebrew’s equivalent expression is בסופו של דבר – literally, at the end of the matter. For example: […]

By Ami Steinberger | August 24, 2015 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “stop fighting” in Hebrew

תַּפְסִיקוּ לָרִיב Suppose you’re driving on a family trip in Israel, and the two boys are fighting in the back seat. You might turn your head around and say to them: תפסיקו לריב, שניכם! Stop fighting, the two of you! The expression broken down: תפסיקו – literally, you (plural) will stop. It’s a form of the causative verb להפסיק […]

By Ami Steinberger | August 23, 2015 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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heartburn, routers, and… I have no idea – WEEKLY REVIEW

חֹמֶר לְשִׁנּוּן Review Material Can’t read Hebrew yet? You spent time on your Hebrew this week. Use these review materials to make it yours to keep. Flashcards Game Test שַׁבָּת שָׁלוֹם, וְסוֹף שָׁבוּעַ נָעִים! Shabbat Shalom, and have a nice weekend!

By Ami Steinberger | August 21, 2015 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “to make aliyah” in Hebrew

לַעֲשׂוֹת עֲלִיָּה Outside of Israel, getting called up to the Torah is called getting an aliyah. That last word is pronounced – at least in Ashkenazi communities – ah-LEE-yah, so that it sounds different from the word that means immigration to Israel – עליה– aliyah. To an Israeli, however, these two words sound the same – because they’re […]

By Ami Steinberger | August 20, 2015 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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