Your Daily Dose of Hebrew

how to say “*a* falafel” in Hebrew

מָנָה פָלָאפֶל Hebrew has no word for a. That’s why you might come across a native Hebrew speaker saying something like “do you have car?” And that’s if they know the word do, which also doesn’t exist in Hebrew. If you’re ordering a falafel in English, you’d probably say “I’d like a falafel.” But to do so in Hebrew, […]

By Ami Steinberger | April 2, 2017 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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Weekly Hebrew Review – fresh, homemade ingredients to roast and cool down

חֹמֶר לְשִׁנּוּן Review Material Can’t read Hebrew yet? You spent time on your Hebrew this week. Use these review materials to make it yours to keep. Flashcards . Scatter . Gravity . Test שבת שלום, וסוף שבוע נעים! Shabbat Shalom, and have a nice weekend!

By Ami Steinberger | March 31, 2017 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “to cool down” in Hebrew

לְהִתְקָרֵר I love it when the weather gets warm – כשמזג האוויר מתחמם. The reflexive verb להתחמם derives from חום – heat. Likewise, to cool down is להתקרר – also a reflexive verb – from קור – cold. For example: חכה עד שהמרק יתקרר. Wait till the soup cools down. A cooling trend is מגמת התקררות. For example: אין כבר כמעט מגמות […]

By Ami Steinberger | March 30, 2017 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 2 Comments
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how to say “to roast” in Hebrew

לִקְלוֹת, לִצְלוֹת While in English a roast might involve a person (who doesn’t actually get eaten), in Hebrew the term refers only to food. Well, it’s two terms, one for veggies and one for meat. לקלות means to roast that which grows from the ground, such as sunflower seeds and chestnuts. For example: אתה קולה את הגרנולה בבית? You […]

By Ami Steinberger | March 29, 2017 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “ingredients” in Hebrew

רְכִיבִים This word appears on the vast majority of packaged foods in Israel: רכיבים – ingredients. It comes from the root ר.כ.ב meaning attaching or assembling. For example: יש כאן רכיבים מפחידים ברשימה… There are some scary ingredients here on the list… In the singular form, רכיב generally refers not to a food ingredient, but to a component in a system. […]

By Ami Steinberger | March 28, 2017 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 2 Comments
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how to say “fresh” in Hebrew

טָרִי Although you might have eaten at a restaurant in Jerusalem called פרש, the true Hebrew word for fresh is טרי. For example: בשוק מחנה יהודה קונים ירקות טריים וטעימים. At the Mahane Yehuda market, (you can) buy fresh, tasty vegetables. There, you a seller might try to get you to buy a watermelon saying it’s !טרי טרי […]

By Ami Steinberger | March 27, 2017 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “homemade” in Hebrew

בֵּיתִי If you’ve had even minimal contact with Hebrew or the Jewish world, the word בית (in the construct state, pronounced beit) probably sounds familiar to you. It means house or home. For example: ברוכים הבאים לבית שלי. Welcome to my home. By extension, something homemade is ביתי in the masculine and ביתית in the feminine – literally, homey. For example: זאת […]

By Ami Steinberger | March 26, 2017 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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Weekly Hebrew Review – working out to the core

חֹמֶר לְשִׁנּוּן Review Material Can’t read Hebrew yet? You spent time on your Hebrew this week. Use these review materials to make it yours to keep. Flashcards . Scatter . Gravity . Test שבת שלום, וסוף שבוע נעים! Shabbat Shalom, and have a nice weekend!

By Ami Steinberger | March 24, 2017 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “core” in Hebrew

לִבָּה The English word core comes from the French coeur meaning heart. Thus the Hebrew word for core – ליבה – makes sense, as it is derived from לב – heart. For example: חשבון ואנגלית הם מקצועות ליבה. Arithmetic and English are core subject. and היא עושה אימון ליבה פעמיים בשבוע. She does core workout twice a week.

By Ami Steinberger | March 23, 2017 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “it’s on me!” in Hebrew

עָלַי! An essential Hebrew preposition is על – on, as in: שב על התחת! Sit on your butt! (to a boy) על can be found everywhere in Hebrew texts from biblical to modern. Its more ancient full version עלי appears in its pure form only in poetry. But in its declined form, it appears everywhere as well: […]

By Ami Steinberger | March 22, 2017 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “cardio” in Hebrew

סִבֹּלֶת לֵב-רֵאָה The Hebrew expression סיבולת לב-ריאה is a lot longer than cardio, but looks can be deceiving: cardio is a shortened version of cardio-vascular exercise. סיבולת לב-ריאה translates literally as heart-lung endurance, where סיבולת means endurance, לב means heart and ריאה means lung (lungs are ריאות). For example: הרמת משקולות היא לא תורמת הרבה לסיבולת לב-ריאה. Lifting weights does not contribute much to […]

By Ami Steinberger | March 21, 2017 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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