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conversation: how to say “to try” in Hebrew

- תנסי לישון קצת. - למה? אני בכלל לא עייפה. - כן, אבל אם לא תנוחי עכשיו, לא יהיה לך כוח לרקוד בחתונה הלילה. - Try to sleep a little. - Why? I'm not tired at all. - Yeah, but if you don't rest now, you won't have energy to dance at the wedding tonight. [...]
By Ami Steinberger | October 21, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “to try” in Hebrew

לְנַסּוֹת Hebrew has a few words for to try, depending on the type of trying. להשתדל (a התפעל verb) and לעשות מאמץ mean to make an effort. But the most generic word for to try is the פיעל verb לנסות. For example, you might say to a boy or a man: תנסה לישון קצת. Try to sleep a little. […]

By Ami Steinberger | October 21, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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Weekly YDDH Review

חֹמֶר לְשִׁנּוּן Review Material You spent time on your Hebrew this week. Use these review materials to make it yours to keep.      To take full advantage of the review material, click on “Choose a study mode” in the bottom right corner of the box above. שבת שלום, וסוף שבוע נעים! Shabbat Shalom, […]

By Ami Steinberger | October 19, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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Yom HaAliyah Webinar Recording

Audio Recording of Webinar Word Visualization

By Aaron | October 18, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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conversation: what “maapilim” means in Hebrew

- חלק מעליית הנוער הגיעו ארצה באוניות מעפילים. - סבתא, הכרת אנשים שעלו ארצה ככה? - כן, וגם אתה מכיר אחת מהן. - את מי? - אותי. - Some of Youth Aliyah arrived to Israel via maapilim ships. - Grandma, did you know people who made aliyah that way? - Yes, and you know one of [...]
By Ami Steinberger | October 18, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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what “maapilim” (מעפילים) means in Hebrew

מַעְפִּילִים This is a term with no real English equivalent: מעפילים (the closest translation I found was internee, but who knows what that is). The Modern-Hebrew term refers to Jews, mostly displaced persons after the Holocaust, trying to break the blockade of the British Mandate before the State of Israel was established. Here’s the term in context: […]

By Ami Steinberger | October 18, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “Youth Aliyah” in Hebrew

עֲלִיַּת הַנֹּעַר With a Germany of the 1930s becoming more and more hostile towards Jews, a woman named Recha Freier took action and launched a movement called עליית הנוער – youth aliyah, or immigration of the youth to the Land of Israel. Here’s the term in context: הרבה יהודים ניצלו מהשואה בזכות עליית הנוער. Many Jews survived the […]

By Ami Steinberger | October 17, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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conversation: how to say “Youth Aliyah” in Hebrew

- הרבה יהודים ניצלו מהשואה בזכות עליית הנוער. - מה זה עליית הנוער? - עליית הנוער היא תנועה שנוסדה בגרמניה לפני השואה, על מנת להביא יהודים צעירים לארץ ישראל. - Many Jews were saved from the Holocaust thanks to Youth Aliyah. - What's Youth Aliyah? - Youth Aliyah is the movement that was founded in [...]
By Ami Steinberger | October 17, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “new immigrant” in Hebrew

עוֹלֶה חָדָשׁ Mind you, this special term refers specifically to new immigrants to Israel. An עולֶה (a male) or an עולָה (female) is someone who has made aliyah – immigrated to Israel (literally, one who ascends). Thus an עולה חדש or an עולה חדשה is a new immigrant. For example: פעם היינו עולים חדשים, אבל היום אנחנו אזרחים […]

By Ami Steinberger | October 16, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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conversation: how to say “new immigrant” in Hebrew

- כמה שנים אתם כבר בארץ? - הקיץ יהיה ארבעים שנה מאז שעלינו. - זה המון זמן. - כן, פעם היינו עולים חדשים. אבל היום אנחנו אזרחים רגילים. - How many years have you been in Israel? - This summer will be forty years since we made aliyah. - That's a long time. - Yeah, [...]
By Ami Steinberger | October 16, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “citizenship” in Hebrew

אֶזְרָחוּת The word אזרח appears already in Biblical Hebrew, where it refers to a person native to a particular land or people. Today a person can become an אזרח or אזרחית – a citizen of a country (male and female, respectively), without having been born there. And citizenship? That’s אזרחות. For example: יש לה שני דרכונים כי יש […]

By Ami Steinberger | October 15, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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