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Weekly Hebrew Review – leaving the lights on: tension, danger and refineries

חֹמֶר לְשִׁנּוּן Review Material Can’t read Hebrew yet? You spent time on your Hebrew this week. Use these review materials to make it yours to keep.  Flashcards . Scatter . Gravity . Test שבת שלום, וסוף שבוע נעים! Shabbat Shalom, and have a nice weekend!

By Ami Steinberger | February 23, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “refinery” in Hebrew

בֵּית זִקּוּק The letters כ and ק sound alike in Modern Hebrew, when the כ is hard. In ancient times they sounded different, but similar. Sometimes meanings of roots and words are similar when in one root there’s a כ and in the other there’s a ק. One such example is in the active-intensive פיעל […]

By Ami Steinberger | February 22, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “danger” in Hebrew

סַכָּנָה If you’ve spent enough time around kids in Israel, you almost certainly know the word מסוכן – dangerous, as in: אסור לחצות את הכביש בלי להסתכל – זה מסוכן! It’s not allowed to cross the street without looking – it’s dangerous!  A related word is the one for danger itself: סכנה. For example, if you’ve taken […]

By Ami Steinberger | February 21, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “suspense” in Hebrew

מֶתַח The word מתח means literally tension, while מתוח means tense. But it also means suspense, as in סרטי מתח – suspense films, as well as: אל תשאירו אותי במתח! Don’t leave me in suspense! מתח also has a meaning in physics – voltage.

By Ami Steinberger | February 20, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “to leave (behind)” in Hebrew

לְהַשְׁאִיר All the lights are on in the house, and you rush out to the supermarket, forgetting to turn off the lights. You might smack your forehead and say: השארתי את כל האורות בבית דלוקים. I left all the lights on in the house. The word השארתי – I left – is a form of the […]

By Ami Steinberger | February 19, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “the light is on” in Hebrew

הָאוֹר דּוֹלֵק (הָאוֹר דָּלוּק) How does blessing for lighting Hanukkah candles go? להדליק נר של חנוכה. להדליק means to light or to turn on. What about something that is already on? Hebrew has two words for this: דולק and דלוק. The first one, דולק, means literally is burning, while the second one, דלוק, means is turned on or has been set to burn. […]

By Ami Steinberger | February 18, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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Weekly Hebrew Review – feelings, preferences and soup

חֹמֶר לְשִׁנּוּן Review Material Can’t read Hebrew yet? You spent time on your Hebrew this week. Use these review materials to make it yours to keep.  Flashcards . Scatter . Gravity . Test שבת שלום, וסוף שבוע נעים! Shabbat Shalom, and have a nice weekend!

By Ami Steinberger | February 16, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “to stay” in Hebrew

לְהִשָּׁאֵר THe Hebrew word for to stay or to remain is להישאר – a nifal verb based on the root ש.א.ר meaning the rest. For example: למה נשארת בגשם בלי מטרייה? Why did you (a male) stay in the rain without an umbrella? Now although you can say to stay at home with להישאר בבית, […]

By Ami Steinberger | February 15, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “umbrella” in Hebrew

מִטְרִיָּה The Hebrew word for umbrella, מטרייה, comes from the word מטר meaning precipitation (also a fancy word for rain). For example: אני מעדיף ללכת בגשם עם כובע, בלי מטרייה. I prefer walking in the rain with a hat, without an umbrella.

By Ami Steinberger | February 14, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “to prefer” in Hebrew

לְהַעֲדִיף The Hebrew word for to prefer is the active-causative להעדיף. It comes from the root ע.ד.פ meaning surplus: something we prefer has sort of a surplus in our minds over something else. For example: מה את מעדיפה, מרק ירקות או מרק כתום? What do you prefer, vegetable soup or orange soup? A preference is […]

By Ami Steinberger | February 13, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “orange soup” in Hebrew

מָרָק כָּתוֹם There are words in Hebrew for carrot soup, sweet potato soup and squash soup, but Israelis tend to refer to all of these simply as מרק כתום – orange soup. For example: מרק כתום בחורף עושה הרגשה של בית. Orange soup in the winter creates (makes) a homey feeling. Now, כתום is the […]

By Ami Steinberger | February 12, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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