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Weekly Hebrew Review – past, present, future, and is it worth it to steal?

חֹמֶר לְשִׁנּוּן Review Material Can’t read Hebrew yet? You spent time on your Hebrew this week. Use these review materials to make it yours to keep.  Flashcards . Scatter . Gravity . Test שבת שלום, וסוף שבוע נעים! Shabbat Shalom, and have a nice weekend!

By Ami Steinberger | February 9, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “stolen” in Hebrew

גָּנוּב You may be familiar with the eighth of the ten commandments: לא תגנוב – do not steal. לגנוב is to steal. Likewise, something stolen is גנוב. For example: לא כדאי לקנות מכונית גנובה. It’s not good (worthwhile) to buy a stolen car. גנוב is also used in slang to refer to a person as one might in […]

By Ami Steinberger | February 8, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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one way to say “worth it” in Hebrew

כְּדַאי Hebrew has several ways of saying worthwhile or worth it in Hebrew, one of which is שווה – literally, equal, a word we’ve seen recently in this blog. Perhaps the most common word to express worthwhile is כדאי, deriving originally from Aramaic. For example: לא כדאי. It’s not worth it. With the word יותר – more, it becomes better, […]

By Ami Steinberger | February 7, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “the present” in Hebrew

הַהוֶֹה So we’ve seen future – עתיד, and past – עבר. What about present? That’s הווה. Here’s an example that combines all three: העבר הוא כבר עבר והעתיד הוא עוד רחוק – עכשיו זה הזמן להפוך את ההווה ליותר מתוק. The past has already passed and the future is still far away – now is the time to […]

By Ami Steinberger | February 6, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “the past” in Hebrew

הֶעָבָר Yesterday we saw the word עתיד – literally, future. The Hebrew word for past is עבר. For example: אל תיתקע בעבר, תתכונן לעתיד. Don’t get stuck in the past, prepare for the future. (spoken to a male) עבר means literally (it) has passed.

By Ami Steinberger | February 5, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “she will” in Hebrew

הִיא עֲתִידָה לְ… Modern Hebrew’s future tense works with verbs. Some examples: הוא יתקשר. He will call. היא תדבר איתו. She’ll speak with him. But there’s also a special word for will (do) – a bit more literary than what you’d use in the average conversation, but still good to know. The word is actually the […]

By Ami Steinberger | February 4, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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Weekly Hebrew Review – problems of the rich… and a soccer field

חֹמֶר לְשִׁנּוּן Review Material Can’t read Hebrew yet? You spent time on your Hebrew this week. Use these review materials to make it yours to keep.  Flashcards . Scatter . Gravity . Test שבת שלום, וסוף שבוע נעים! Shabbat Shalom, and have a nice weekend!

By Ami Steinberger | February 2, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 1 Comment
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how to say “soccer field” in Hebrew

מִגְרַשׁ כַּדּוּרֶגֶל The Hebrew word for lot or plot is מגרש. For example: היום המגרש שווה מעל שלושה מיליון שקלים. Today the lot is worth over three million shekels. A lot dedicated to soccer is מגרש כדורגל: בואו ניפגש במגרש הכדורגל. Let’s meet at the soccer field. כדורגל combines כדור – ball, with רגל – foot.

By Ami Steinberger | February 1, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “equal” in Hebrew

שָׁוֶה The Hebrew word for equal is שוֶה  in the masculine and שוָה in the feminine. Here’s an example in the plural:  ניתן לשלם את הארנונה בשנים עשר תשלומים שווים. One may pay property tax in twelve equal payments. שווה is also used in slang to mean worthwhile or great. For example: איזה רכב שווה! What a great car!

By Ami Steinberger | January 31, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “property tax” in Hebrew

אַרְנוֹנָה If you’ve rented or owned property in Israel, you almost certainly know the word ארנונה – property tax. For example: ארנונה על בית פרטי – צרות של עשירים. Property tax on a private home – rich-people problems. ארנונה first appeared in Mishnaic Hebrew, where it referred to tax imposed on produce based on an annual […]

By Ami Steinberger | January 30, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “rich-people problems” in Hebrew

צָרוֹת שֶׁל עֲשִׁירִים Some people’s problems – צרות – revolve around not having enough money. Other people have problems because they don’t know what to do with all their money. In Hebrew, these are צרות של עשירים – rich-people problems. For example: לאן לטוס לחופשה – צרות של עשירים. Where to fly for vacation – rich-people […]

By Ami Steinberger | January 29, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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