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How to say “disgusting” in Hebrew

גֹּעַל נֶפֶשׁ, מַגְעִיל This is one of the less pleasant Hebrew expressions but useful nonetheless. This evocative expression, גועל נפש means literally abhorrent to the soul. Suppose you come back from a long vacation only to find that you left some milk in the fridge. When your unassuming family member grabs for it, you might […]

By Ami Steinberger | May 10, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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How to say “expired” in Hebrew

פַּג הַתֹּקֶף The Hebrew word for period as in period of time is תקופה. For example: היא יודעת הרבה על התקופה הרומאית. She knows a lot about the Roman period. A related word is תוקף – validity. So the expression פג התוקף – expired – means literally the validity is up, since לפוג is a word for to end. For example: […]

By Ami Steinberger | May 9, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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How to say “to throw away” in Hebrew

לִזְרֹק, לְהַשְׁלִיךְ You may know the Hebrew word for to throw – לזרוק, a פעל verb. For example: זרוק את הכדור! Throw the ball! (to a male) But perhaps you didn’t know that לזרוק also means to toss into the garbage, for example: הגיע הזמן לעשות סדר ולזרוק פה כמה דברים. It’s about time to make some order […]

By Ami Steinberger | May 8, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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How to say “it’s about time” in Hebrew

הִגִּיעַ הַזְּמַן To ask someone what time it is in Hebrew, you’d say ?מה השעה. This means literally, what is the hour? The Hebrew word for time itself, though, is זמן. And to say, it’s about time, you’d say the time has arrived – הגיע הזמן. For example: הגיע הזמן שתתחילו לקחת את הקורס הזה ברצינות. It’s time that […]

By Ami Steinberger | May 7, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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How to say “seriously” in Hebrew

לָקַחַת בִּרְצִינוּת The Hebrew word for serious is רציני for a male or a masculine object, and רצינית for a female or a feminine object. I’m not sure of its etymology. There is a biblical figure named רצין – Retzin, the king of Aram, but there’s no indication of how serious he was. רציני may […]

By Ami Steinberger | May 6, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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Weekly YDDH Review

The post earlier this week “How to say ‘flood’ in Hebrew” has changed. See updated version here. חֹמֶר לְשִׁנּוּן Review Material Can’t read Hebrew yet? You spent time on your Hebrew this week. Use these review materials to make it yours to keep.  Flashcards . Scatter . Gravity . Test שבת שלום, וסוף שבוע נעים! Shabbat Shalom, and […]

By Ami Steinberger | May 4, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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How to say “wholesale” in Hebrew

סִיטוֹנִי, בְּסִיטוֹנָאוּת The Hebrew words for wholesale in the commercial sense first appear in the Mishnah, but derive from the Greek σιτωνης – sitones. In adjective form, the word is סיטוני. For example: השוק הסיטוני בישראל משגשג. The wholesale market in Israel is booming. But the more common expression is the adverb בסיטואנות – literally, in wholesaleness, as in: […]

By Ami Steinberger | May 3, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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How to say “produce” in Hebrew

תְּבוּאָה To produce something such as a movie is להפיק. But produce in the agricultural sense is תבואה. For example: חוסר הניקוז הרס את כל התבואה בשדה. The lack of drainage destroyed all the produce in the field. תבואה comes from the root ב.ו.א meaning to come: produce is that which comes or is brought up from the field after human (or machine) […]

By Ami Steinberger | May 2, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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How to say “to drain” in Hebrew

לְנַקֵּז, לְהִתְנַקֵּז The Hebrew word for to drain something actively is the פיעל verb לנקז. For example: התעלה הזאת אמורה לנקז את המים. This ditch is supposed to drain the water. Often, though, we speak of water being drained – or draining itself. Here we use the התפעל verb להתנקז. For example: המים הציפו את הרחוב לפני שהם התנקזו לביוב. The […]

By Ami Steinberger | May 1, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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How to say “flood” in Hebrew

הֲצָפָה While שיטפון is a flash flood, the Hebrew word for a standard flood is הצפה. For example: ההצפות בארץ בשבוע שעבר גבו קרבנות. The floods in Israel last week claimed victims. הצפה is a noun coming from the הפעיל verb, להציף – to flood. The root is צ.ו.פ meaning float. * After having published a Dose of Hebrew about […]

By Ami Steinberger | April 30, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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How to say “sewer” in Hebrew

בִּיּוּב  The Hebrew word for sewer when referring to a sewer system is ביוב. It comes from the word ביב meaning gutter, which first appears in Mishnaic Hebrew. Here’s ביוב in context: מחר יבואו לתקן את הביוב. Tomorrow they’ll come to fix the sewer. ביוב is a noun derived from the active-intensive פיעל verb form.

By Ami Steinberger | April 29, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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