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Weekly Hebrew Review – the need for explanations, or lack thereof

חֹמֶר לְשִׁנּוּן Review Material Can’t read Hebrew yet? You spent time on your Hebrew this week. Use these review materials to make it yours to keep.  Flashcards . Scatter . Gravity . Test שבת שלום, וסוף שבוע נעים! Shabbat Shalom, and have a nice weekend!

By Ami Steinberger | March 2, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “to explain” in Hebrew

לְהַסְבִּיר The Modern Hebrew word for to explain – להסביר – comes from the Aramaic root ס.ב.ר meaning thinking. Hebrew takes the root and plugs it into the active-causative הפעיל verb form. For example: אתה קולט אותי, או שאני צריך להסביר? Do you (a male) get me, or do I (also a male) need to explain? and: […]

By Ami Steinberger | March 1, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “to get it” in Hebrew

לִקְלוֹט The word לקלוט means literally to absorb or to take in, for example: החור באדמה נועד לקלוט כדורי גולף. The hole in the ground is meant to catch (take in) golf balls. But לקלוט also comes in handy when referring to one’s ability to “get” that which is said to them: לא כולם קולטים רמזים. Not […]

By Ami Steinberger | February 28, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “to hint” in Hebrew

לִרְמוֹז, לְרַמֵּז You may know the Hebrew word for traffic light – רמזור. This word combines two others: רמז – hint (in our case, an indication) and אור – light. For example: בצמתים רבים בארץ יש כיכר במקום רמזור. At many intersections in Israel there is a roundabout instead of a traffic light. To hint is usually the simple verb […]

By Ami Steinberger | February 27, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “to read between the lines” in Hebrew

לִקְרוֹא בֵּין הַשּׁוּרוֹת One element of writing style is to say one thing and hint at another – to communicate between the lines. Such writing has an emotional impact on the reader, persuading them more so than straightforward language can do. In Hebrew, to read between the lines is a literal translation: לקרוא בין השורות. For example: […]

By Ami Steinberger | February 26, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “the fine print” in Hebrew

הָאוֹתִיוֹת הַקְּטַנּוֹת Hebrew’s expression for the fine print – that important text in a contract that people often gloss over – is literally the small letters: האותיות הקטנות. For example: אל תחתום על ההסכם עד שקראת את האותיות הקטנות! Don’t sign the agreement until you’ve read the fine print! (spoken to a male) אותיות is the plural […]

By Ami Steinberger | February 25, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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Weekly Hebrew Review – leaving the lights on: tension, danger and refineries

חֹמֶר לְשִׁנּוּן Review Material Can’t read Hebrew yet? You spent time on your Hebrew this week. Use these review materials to make it yours to keep.  Flashcards . Scatter . Gravity . Test שבת שלום, וסוף שבוע נעים! Shabbat Shalom, and have a nice weekend!

By Ami Steinberger | February 23, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “refinery” in Hebrew

בֵּית זִקּוּק The letters כ and ק sound alike in Modern Hebrew, when the כ is hard. In ancient times they sounded different, but similar. Sometimes meanings of roots and words are similar when in one root there’s a כ and in the other there’s a ק. One such example is in the active-intensive פיעל […]

By Ami Steinberger | February 22, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “danger” in Hebrew

סַכָּנָה If you’ve spent enough time around kids in Israel, you almost certainly know the word מסוכן – dangerous, as in: אסור לחצות את הכביש בלי להסתכל – זה מסוכן! It’s not allowed to cross the street without looking – it’s dangerous!  A related word is the one for danger itself: סכנה. For example, if you’ve taken […]

By Ami Steinberger | February 21, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “suspense” in Hebrew

מֶתַח The word מתח means literally tension, while מתוח means tense. But it also means suspense, as in סרטי מתח – suspense films, as well as: אל תשאירו אותי במתח! Don’t leave me in suspense! מתח also has a meaning in physics – voltage.

By Ami Steinberger | February 20, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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how to say “to leave (behind)” in Hebrew

לְהַשְׁאִיר All the lights are on in the house, and you rush out to the supermarket, forgetting to turn off the lights. You might smack your forehead and say: השארתי את כל האורות בבית דלוקים. I left all the lights on in the house. The word השארתי – I left – is a form of the […]

By Ami Steinberger | February 19, 2018 | Your Daily Dose of Hebrew | 0 Comments
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